Topics in Energy:
Bioenergy refers to the energy associated with materials derived from biological sources. Bioenergy includes biofuels, such as ethanol produced from corn or sugarcane, and biopower, which...
Climate change refers to any significant change in measures of climate (such as temperature, precipitation, or wind) lasting for an extended period (decades or longer). Climate...
Coal is a combustible black or brownish-black sedimentary rock composed mostly of carbon and hydrocarbons. It is the world's most abundant fossil fuel. Coal powered the...
Energy is used in four broad segments of society: industry, households, commercial buildings and transportation.  Energy efficiency refers to how effectively energy is used to perform...
Energy plays a vital role in the economy. Energy goes hand-in-hand with the production of goods and services, which explains why economic growth in industrial nations...
Electricity is the flow of electrical power or charge. It is both a basic part of nature and one of our most widely used forms of...
Energy conversion refers to the change in energy from one form to another, and the useful work that is derived from that conversion. The earliest energy...
Each stage of the energy system has significant impacts on the environment.  Coal and uranium mining, hydropower, and oil production disturb ecosystems, while the manufacture of...
Geothermal energy (from the Greek roots geo, meaning earth, and therm, meaning heat) refers to energy in the form of natural heat flowing outward from within...
The energy system produces significant risk to human health at every stage. Historically, coal mining has been a very dangerous activity and the list of historical...
Hydrogen is the lightest and most abundant chemical element, constituting roughly 75 % of the Universe's mass. Naturally occurring elemental hydrogen is relatively rare on Earth...
Hydroelectric power or simply hydropower refers to electricity generated through use of the gravitational force of falling water. The principle of hydropower is simple; the force...
Nuclear energy is released by the splitting or the fusing of the nuclei of atoms. The conversion of nuclear mass to energy is explained by Einstein's...
Petroleum and natural gas are the signature fuels of the modern world.  Their discovery in the 19th century and then rapid development in the 20th century...
The importance of energy to society and the wealth generated by its control lead  governments to regulate its ownership, access, and sale. During times of war...
Energy is the common link between the living and non-living realms of the universe, and thus it is an integrator across all fields in science, technology...
Energy use is determined by cultural, social and historical forces. A desire for high material standard of living, for example, implies a high demand for energy...
The intense pressure at the core of the Sun fuses four hydrogen atoms into a single helium atom, and in doing so converts some of the...
Society continuously needs new quantities of energy to replace the fuels that we use up. To avoid energy supply interruptions that could disrupt the economy and...
Since the time when humans first harnessed energy flows in nature, they have fought bitterly for control of those regions of the Earth that grant access...
Humans have been using wind power for nearly 6,000 years to propel sailboats and sailing ships. Windmills have been used for irrigation pumping and for milling...

More Content